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The Academy and MoMA Celebrate Documentaries & “BEHIND THE BALLOT” Series Now LIVE On Oscar.com

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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will present “Oscar’s Docs, 1955–2002: American Stories” from February 2 through February 14 at MoMA in New York City. This annual collaboration highlights Oscar®–winning and nominated short and feature-length documentary films that explore the history, culture and politics of the United States. All prints are from the Academy Film Archive’s collection. The filmmakers will be present at several screenings (visit MoMA.org for details).

The schedule is as follows:

Sat., Feb. 2, 2 p.m.
American Dream (1990)
Barbara Kopple. This stirring film depicts the effects of a mid-1980s strike by the workers of a Hormel meatpacking plant in Austin, Minnesota. 98 min.

Sat., Feb. 2, 8 p.m.
Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision (1994)
Freida Lee Mock. A profile of Maya Lin, the young artist who created the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington and other politically motivated artistic creations. 105 min.

Sun., Feb. 3, 2:30 p.m.
Princeton: A Search for Answers (1973)
Julian Krainin and DeWitt Sage. At one of the world’s premiere universities, where great thinkers dare to ask simple questions, men and women are involved in the intense, exciting process of discovery-from music composition to Shakespeare to the nature of the cosmos. 28 min.

The Stone Carvers (1984)
Marjorie Hunt and Paul Wagner. A tight-knit group of Italian Americans has been working for years on the Washington Cathedral, and their dedication and spirit is evident in the way they bring inanimate stone to brilliant life. Stone carving is delicate and satisfying work, and these artists point with pride to the product of their efforts. 30 min.

The Personals: Improvisations on Romance in the Golden Years (1998)
Keiko Ibi. At a community theater in Manhattan, a group of senior citizens rehearse and perform an original play about their romantic lives. 37 min.

Sun., Feb. 3, 5:30 p.m.
Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989)
Robert Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman. Common Threads brings the AIDS epidemic into sharp personal focus through the stories of five people memorialized on the NAMES Project’s Memorial Quilt. 79 min.

Mon., Feb. 4, 7 p.m.
Marjoe (1972)
Howard Smith and Sarah Kernochan. Marjoe is an extraordinarily charismatic young man making a living on the Christian revivalist circuit. His fiery antics in the name of the Lord are as much performance art as fire and brimstone preaching, and he’s adept at getting the faithful to part with their money. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive. 88 min.

Sat., Feb. 9, 2 p.m.
Women – for America, for the World (1986)
Vivienne Verdon-Roe. A portrait of 22 prominent American women and their commonsensical, compassionate call for an end to the nuclear arms race and a reassessment of national priorities. 30 min.

Days of Waiting (1990)
Steven Okazaki. Estelle Ishigo, one of the few Caucasians to be interned with 110,000 Japanese Americans in 1942, recorded the deprivations of the camp in her sketches and watercolors. 28 min.

Twin Towers (2002)
An elite NYPD emergency response unit, on call for a variety of extreme situations, took a heavy blow on 9/11, including the loss of Joseph Vigiano, a talented officer who had roots in public service. 34 min.

Sat., Feb. 9, 5 p.m.
The Great American Cowboy (1973)
Kieth Merrill. Focusing on two men competing for the sport’s national championship, Merrill’s film goes behind the scenes at the American Rodeo. 89 min.

Sun., Feb. 10, 5:30 p.m.
The Horse with the Flying Tail (1960)
Larry Lansburgh. It’s the story of one horse’s journey to the big time. “Nautical” the golden palomino was born into poverty and put to work at a variety of jobs with no guarantee that he would be treated well. But the horse is a natural-born jumper, and fate finally steps in to give him a chance at competing in what he loves best: soaring over hurdles. 48 min.

The Flight of the Gossamer Condor (1978)
Ben Shedd. Chronicling Paul MacCready’s historic invention, construction, and ultimately successful test of the first human-powered flying machine, Shedd’s film captures the hard work, adventurous spirit, and creative thinking that went into making an impossible dream into a scientific reality. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive. 27 min.

Mon., Feb. 11, 8 p.m.
The Panama Deception (1992)
Barbara Trent. The Panama Deception documents the untold story of the December 1989 U.S. invasion of Panama-the events that led us there, the excessive use of military force, the enormity of the death and destruction, and the devastating aftermath. 91 min.

Wed., Feb. 13, 4:30 p.m.
Helen Keller in Her Story (1955)
Nancy Hamilton. Hamilton’s film tells the story of the deaf and blind disabled-rights pioneer. Preserved by Academy Film Archive. Special thanks to the American Foundation for the Blind. 53 min.

Number Our Days (1976)
Lynne Littman. Number Our Days goes inside of a community of elderly Eastern European Jews living in Venice, California. Preserved by the Academy Film Archive. 29 min.

Thurs., Feb. 14, 8 p.m.
Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989)
(See Sun., Feb. 3)

MoMA is located at 11 West 53rd Street. For ticket information, visit MoMA.org.

SETH MACFARLANE

For Oscar fans that just can’t seem to win their Oscar ballot pool because of that one craft category, Oscar.com has launched “Behind The Ballot,” a six-part video series that explores how Academy members view and ultimately determine who’ll win Oscars for Production Design, Cinematography, Makeup and Hairstyling, Film Editing, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing and Costume Design.

Hosted by Entertainment Weekly’s Geoff Boucher, Anthony Breznican and Adam Vary, each episode, shot in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library, features a panel of experts discussing what it takes to be a strong contender in each category. A new video will debut each week for the next five weeks on www.oscar.com, as well as on the official Oscars app for iPhone, iPad, Android and Kindle Fire devices.

Expert participants include:

Production Design:
Scott Chambliss, “Cowboys & Aliens,” “Star Trek,” “Mission: Impossible III”
Alex McDowell, “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” “Minority Report,” “Fight Club”
Jeannine Oppewall, “Catch Me If You Can,” “Pleasantville,” “L.A. Confidential”
Bo Welch, “Men in Black,” “Batman Returns,” “Edward Scissorhands”

Makeup and Hairstyling:
Cydney Cornell, “The Artist,” “The Aviator,” “American Beauty”
Mike Elizalde, “Hellboy II: The Golden Army,” “Fantastic Four,” “Men in Black”
Beth Miller, “Mr. and Mrs. Smith,” “The Nutty Professor,” “Dances With Wolves,”
Christien Tinsley, “No Country for Old Men,” “The Passion of the Christ,” “Ocean’s Eleven”

Film Editing:
Mark Goldblatt, “X-Men The Last Stand,” “Armageddon,” “The Terminator”
Virginia Katz, “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1,” “Dreamgirls,” “Kinsey”
Lynzee Klingman, “Man on the Moon,” “City of Angels,” “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
Pamela Martin, “Hitchcock,” “The Fighter,” “Little Miss Sunshine”

Cinematography:
Daryn Okada, “American Reunion,” “Baby Mama,” “Mean Girls”
Theo van de Sande, “Cruel Intentions,” “Blade,” “Wayne’s World”
Mandy Walker, “Red Riding Hood,” “Australia,” “Shattered Glass”

Costume Design:
Jeffrey Kurland, “Inception,” “Ocean’s Eleven,” “Erin Brockovich”
Isis Mussenden, “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader,” “Shrek 2,” “American Psycho”
Arianne Phillips, “W.E.,” “3:10 to Yuma,” “Walk the Line”
Mary Zophres, “True Grit,” “No Country for Old Men,” “The Big Lebowski”

Sound Editing and Sound Mixing:
Willie D. Burton, “Dreamgirls,” “Panic Room,” “The Shawshank Redemption”
Steve Cantamessa, “Tropic Thunder,” “Mr. and Mrs. Smith,” “Ray”
Aaron Glascock, “The Town,” “Good Night, and Good Luck.,” “Ocean’s Eleven”
Mark Mangini, “Warrior,” “The Fifth Element,” “Die Hard with a Vengeance”
Dean Zupancic, “Tangled,” “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” “Pulp Fiction”

Developed by The Academy and Disney/ABC Television Group’s Digital Media Team, Oscar.com and the official Oscars app provide unparalleled access to the Oscars before, during and after the show. Fans can go behind the scenes with show host Seth MacFarlane and the producers as they prepare for the show, as well as find out more about the nominees, access rare exclusive images from The Academy’s archives, and start filling out their My Picks interactive ballot. Friends can view and share the ballot on Facebook, which will update in real time on Oscar Night®, ensuring that the most competitive Oscars handicappers are instantly aware of their ranking among friends.

On Oscar Sunday, February 24, Oscar.com and the official Oscars app will launch Backstage Pass, giving fans unprecedented access to the show. Sponsored by Samsung, Backstage Pass is designed to be the ultimate complement to the live telecast, giving fans premier access to the most memorable moments of the night through over a dozen exclusive live cameras strategically placed on the Red Carpet and throughout the Dolby Theatre™. Special cameras include the Thank You Cam – offering winners an extended opportunity to thank their supporters; Backstage Cam – capturing sound bites, backstage action, short interviews and behind-the-scenes footage; Control Room Cam – allowing users to watch the show’s director in action; and Press Room Cam – featuring moments of winners interacting with the world’s media moments after leaving the stage. It will also feature real-time highlights from the show itself, which promises many surprises on Hollywood’s biggest night.

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www.oscars.org
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Huge passion for film scores, Lives for the Academy Awards, Loves movie trailers.

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